PAM AND TOMMY – Review by Martha K Baker

You just know that, when the voice of a protagonist’s male member gets a credit in the cast list, the motion picture has the tell-tale tongue in the cheek. In eight episodes. Pam and Tommy flashes back and shreds threads of history through the Eighties and Nineties. shedding light on sleazy producers and paparazzi, celebrities, and craven criminals. The result is bright, loud, sad, vicious, painful and stupefying and worth considering as a slice of recent history and a slab of eternal misogyny.

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PAM & TOMMY – Review by Pam Grady

Pam & Tommy is tabloid television given an elegant veneer by its A-list cast and the fig leaf of feminism offered by the women on the production team and women like Lake Bell who direct some of the episodes. But nearly 30 years after all of this first started, this show is really just the latest chapter in the ongoing exploitation of Pamela Anderson, a woman who does not deserve it.

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REBECCA – Review by Susan Granger

Too bad this revised adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel is so inferior to Alfred Hitchock’s Oscar-winning 1940 version (the only Hitchcock movie ever to win Best Picture), starring Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier and Judith Anderson. On the plus side, it’s beautifully photographed by Laurie Rose, who makes the most of the spectacular seaside scenery, stylish period costumes, and historic Hatfield House, former home to Queen Elizabeth I – the same mansion that director Yorgos Lanthimos featured in The Favorite.

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REBECCA – Review by Leslie Combemale

Director Ben Wheatley’s new incarnation of Rebecca is a valiant reinterpretation that is truer to Daphne Du Maurier’s book than it is to the Hitchcock film. While some might argue that a new version of the story is unnecessary, it fills the holes in our imagination as to how the tale plays out, etching into our minds how the flawed romantic characters get out of a jam.

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REBECCA – Review by Martha K Baker

It took three scriptwriters — Jane Goldman, Joe Shrapnel, and Anna Waterhouse — to render Du Maurier’s gothic plot into cinematic Hamburger Helper. Here’s how: They retained the 1935 setting. They held the Depression but retained one depressed widower, a Mr. de Winter (note symbolic name á la Jung). He married a plain Jane (not her name — she’s too low-class for one).

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YESTERDAY – Review by Diana Saenger

As a Baby Boomer I really enjoyed hearing all the Beatles songs that took me back to many places and many unforgettable memories. I hope some of the younger generation will see the movie; and I’m sure they will like the songs that have never stopped showing up across the world for many years. They will also like Himesh Patel as Jack. His singing is so well done when he faces a field of thousands of screaming fans.

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LITTLE WOODS – Review by Roxana Hadadi

The Western genre has experienced a modern resurgence over the past few years with narratives that pull focus away from the genre’s hypermasculine origins and toward stories that are more individualistic, more character-driven. in Little Woods, Nia DaCosta, Tessa Thompson, and Lily James have created something tense, timely and empathetic, expanding the Western genre and adding another slice of American life to it.

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