MOVING ON – Review by T. J. Callahan

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin are obviously NOT Moving On. They’re back on the big screen again, in a little over a month, co-starring with a smarmy Malcolm McDowell and a suave Richard Roundtree in a rated R for revenge comedy that’s more Grace and Frankie than 80 for Brady. Moving On tells the story of long time friends, Claire and Evelyn, who reunite at the funeral of their college bestie, Joyce. Claire (Fonda) is there for retribution. To right a wrong. To go Dirty Harriet on Joyce’s grieving husband played by McDowell. Evelyn (Tomlin) returns to reveal a long kept secret and act as Claire’s sidekick. Tomlin is Ethel to Fonda’s Lucy, but she ends up with all the laughs.

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MOVING ON – Review by Lois Alter Mark

Moving On, brings Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin back together in a that could almost be called ‘Promising Older Woman.’ This dark comedy uses black humor to shine a light on an important and timely subject – and, thanks to Fonda and Tomlin, it mostly works. The story revolves around Claire (Fonda) and Evelyn (Tomlin), former college roommates who reunite at the funeral of a mutual friend. When we first meet Claire, she’s walking over to the widower (Malcolm McDowell) to inform him, “I’m going to kill you.” She’s not kidding. Underneath the humor, there’s a vital message that needs to be internalized: actions have consequences and moving on can take a lifetime – and, sometimes, a life.

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MOVING ON – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

A good friend knows your rhythms, your flaws, and your secrets, no matter how long it’s been since you’ve seen each other. The droll comedy Moving On knows this in its bones, balancing an on-the-fly murder plot with genuine depth about growing older and cherishing the people who matter. It’s fun all the way through, made even more delightful by the lived-in, playful chemistry of stars Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda.

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SHE WILL – Review by Margaret Barton-Fumo

Charlotte Colbert’s She Will slyly works against the type of horror championed by Executive Producer Dario Argento, in that it is a pointedly feminist work. Whereas Argento was notorious for using his own gloved hands to “murder” actresses onscreen, Colbert works to remedy the harm done by domineering, chauvinist directors who committed transgressions far greater than Argento and his infamous hands. At a time when the “Me Too” movement is starting to lose steam in the public eye, Colbert presents us with a story about how past violence against women can hold strong and continue to torment us for decades—even centuries—into the present.

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