BANEL & ADAMA – Review by Diane Carson

Senegalese writer/director Ramata-Toulaye Sy’s Banel & Adama burrows boldly into the conflict between a couple’s choices and societal customs. Set in contemporary times in the remote northern Senegalese village of Futa immersed in Muslim tradition, nineteen-year-old Adama rejects his culturally designated position as tribal chief, a role incurred by the death of his elder brother Yero.

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BANEL & ADAMA – Review by Jennifer Green

If you know nothing about this fascinating and visually stunning film going in, you can conjecture all sorts of themes and meanings from it. Banel & Adama is an essentially feminist tale about a strong-headed and independent African woman restricted by tradition and duty, and seemingly falling into mental illness. It is also a film about the impact of climate change on one village, where food sources are drying up or dying off during a long season of drought. It could likewise be seen as a story about globalization and modernization, and the loss of local autonomy or traditions. Or maybe it’s simply a tragic love story, in the vein of Romeo & Juliet.

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