DRIVE-AWAY DOLLS – Review by T. J. Callahan

Free spirit Jamie and buttoned up Marian set out on a spur of the moment trek to Tallahassee to break free from former relationships and start anew. Things quickly go wrong when they discover their rental car is carrying even more baggage than they thought…a highly sought after silver attaché. A pair of bumbling wannabe tough guys are soon assigned to the case of retrieving the case which puts the Dolls in danger. Audiences should make sure they buckle up for this barnstorming journey as Drive-Away Dolls takes us on a wild ride of not just criminal capers, but sexual exploration and the tools that can go with it. This film is a phallic farce full of dings and dongs that may make even the uninhibited squirm.

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DRIVE-AWAY DOLLS – Review by Diane Carson

Ethan Coen revives a trashy, B-movie world in Drive-Away Dolls. Fans of Ethan Coen can reliably predict his nonconformist approach in subject and style to his unique, memorable creations. That knowledge certainly informs his latest, Drive-Away Dolls, co-written with Tricia Cooke, Ethan’s wife. According to this month’s American Cinematographer, Coen says he fully intended to make a low-budget “trashy movie.” He succeeds stylistically and thematically in this disjointed road adventure.

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SANCTUARY (TIFF 2022) – Review by Ulkar Alakbarova

Has a thought such as ‘stop the world I want to get off’ crossed your mind while watching a specific film? A film that you have no clue what it’s about; neither its concept nor what it tries to tell you? The film that you have no words to describe. I will tell you what I planned to write about Zachary Wigon’s Sanctuary – this is just a phenomenal film that you won’t be able to not tell your friends about. So just go and watch it. End of review. But as a film critic, I should probably do better than that.

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STARS AT NOON (MIFF 2022) – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Stars at Noon is a seductive, sexy ride, and when we’re in it it’s a pleasant enough journey. Running at well over two hours, however, it does at times overstay its welcome, a result perhaps of a too-loyal commitment to its literary source material. Stars at Noon is a satisfying one night stand of a film; it’s pleasurable enough while it is happening, but the second it’s over it’s almost far too easy to forget.

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MAID – Review by Martha K Baker

The creator of Maid, Molly Smith Metzler, wrought fiction from Maid, a good book of facts about poverty in America. Although it’s best to remember that the television series is not the book (kind of like Nomadland“, the Netflix series sincerely studies poverty — especially its burden on women.

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MY SALINGER YEAR – Review by Maitland McDonagh

The trouble with My Salinger Year isn’t that it’s a terrible movie–it’s not. It’s that its version of Joanna Rakoff ‘s novel is so profoundly uninteresting; earnest, naïve, bright without being especially perceptive and untested by the kind of experiences that fiction writers use to force such unformed characters to develop.

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Filmmaker Margaret Betts on NOVITIATE — Interview by Kristen Page-Kirby

Novitiate” is a love story about a girl in a relationship with a guy who just doesn’t seem to be paying much attention to her. It’s a fairly typical tale, except the girl is a 17-year-old nun in training and the guy is God. In the drama, opening Friday, Cathleen (played by Margaret Qualley) enters the (fictional) convent of the Sisters of Blessed Rose in 1964. She begins her journey toward becoming a nun with a one-year stint as a postulant, getting used to the daily routine of the convent.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK: October 27: NOVITIATE

motw logo 1-35Writer/director Margaret Betts’ first feature is a compelling drama that tells the sometimes-bleak story of Cathleen, an earnest young woman who decides to take the veil in the early 1960s, as Vatican II reforms dictated changes in the cloistered lives of women religious. Novitiate is a stunning eye-opener. Continue reading…

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