BOMBSHELL – Review by Brandy McDonnell

Directed by Jay Roach (HBO’s “Game Change”), there’s a cheeky playfulness to the film that’s unneeded, borderline offensive and counterintuitive. Even the movie’s title seems to winkingly marvel that a group of beautiful blondes – which was basically a requirement for a woman working at Fox News – brought down Ailes, undermining both what they suffered in his allegedly toxic workplace and what they risked in speaking out.

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BOMBSHELL – Review by Martha K Baker

One of the hardest parts of watching “Bombshell” is telling the women apart. Fox News hired svelte blonde women, and the film’s make-up department, headed by Vivian Baker, made the actresses uncannily resemble the newscasters. Harder, however, is watching the sexual harassment unfold in the network culture of Fox news (“news” used advisedly).

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BOMBSHELL – Review by Leslie Combemale

The way Bombshell leaves viewers suggests that Ailes’ ouster left a softer, safer Fox News in his wake. That part of the film is a bit of what Fox excels in: fake news. How would you like to be a member of one of the diverse communities Megyn Kelly and Gretchen Carlson have consistently insulted, only to see these women lionized? Watch the film for Charlize Theron’s spot-on portrayal. Let the rest go. The storyline is peak white feminism.

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ONCE UPON A TIME…IN HOLLYWOOD – Review by Diana Saenger

I was anxious to see Once upon a Time…in Hollywood, especially since it was loaded with a great cast. But, I was quite surprised that many of the scenes that might have seemed funny to writer/director Quentin Tarantino, were so bad that viewers left the theater early and did not return.

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ONCE UPON A TIME…IN HOLLYWOOD – Review by Diane Carson

At two hours forty one minutes, writer/director Quentin Tarantino’s latest self-indulgence, Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood, riffs through a medley mashup of 1969 television series and cinema, all anchored to fading star Rick Dalton and his stunt double Cliff Booth. The film really is, with apologies to Faulkner, a lot of sound and fury, essentially signifying nothing.

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MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS – Review by Brandy McDonnell

A British stage director making her filmmaking debut, Roarke ensures that the production values are high, the twisty plot is clear and Alexandra Byrne’s costume designs are flawless. She brings over the theatrical tradition of casting without regard to color whenever possible, which allows talents like Lester and Gemma Chan (as one of Elizabeth’s confidantes) to get in on the costume drama.

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