CREED III – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

More of a split decision than a knockout, Creed III immerses viewers in visceral boxing scenes but falls short in the character development that made the first two entries in this franchise such a delight. Michael B. Jordan (Black Panther: Wakanda Forever) again returns as Adonis Creed, the son of Apollo Creed, Rocky Balboa’s foe turned friend from the original Rocky franchise. Adonis, also called Donnie, is now a world championship boxer with a wealth of success who feels antsy in his retirement—one of several plot points that feel rushed and similar to the earlier Rocky films.

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CREED III – Review by Susan Kamyab

Creed III is not exactly a knockout, but it is an intense match with some fantastic performances, and a solid directorial debut by Michael B. Jordan. Writing wise, the story has its flaws and feels a little slow at times. However, Jordan’s creative shots and thrilling fight and training sequences help compensate for any sluggish moments. It punches up enough emotions and excitement to satisfy any Rocky fan and is a crowd pleaser that hits harder when watched on the big screen.

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CREED III – Review by Nadine Whitney

In his directorial debut, Creed III, Michael B. Jordan isn’t reinventing the wheel in terms of a sporting story, but he is adding an emotional nuance to it that makes it more than an ex-friends turned enemies battle of wills. Jordan wears his heart on his sleeve as both director and actor. Jonathan Majors could not be more perfectly cast as Dame – he is an actor that even at over six foot and looking like he could throw a truck across a room, is able to exude an internal intensity that is often astonishing. It feels that both Creed and Dame are fighting for their respective lives. Forgiveness is the key to Creed III, whether that be forgiving a child for his reckless actions or forgiving a man who was forged in the worst kind of fire. Jordan’s debut is a knockout.

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Dana Canedy on Faith, Love and A JOURNAL FOR JORDAN – Nell Minow interviews

The title of the book and movie is A Journal for Jordan, but it is really two journals. First Sgt. Charles Monroe King was deployed in Iraq when his son, Jordan, was born, and so his fiancée, Dana Canedy, gave him a journal to give him a connection to the son he would see just once before he was killed in action. When she received the journal with his effects, Canedy, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, shared her own story, with selections from King’s journal, framing each chapter as a letter to their son.

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TOM CLANCY’S WITHOUT REMORSE – Review by Susan Granger

In his 1993 best-seller Without Remorse, novelist Tom Clancy introduced Navy SEAL John Kelly, a character in the Jack Ryan series who has been previously been played on-screen by Liev Schreiber and Willem Dafoe . Now it’s Michael B. Jordan’s turn. As this espionage thriller begins, Kelly’s head emerges from underwater in full scuba gear. He’s on a mission to extract an ‘asset’ out of Aleppo in Syria, where he and his men must unexpectedly battle Russian soldiers instead of the mercenaries that his CIA boss said would be guarding the hostage.

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JUST MERCY – Review by Martha K Baker

In 2014, Stevenson wrote Just Mercy, which recounts the beginning of the Equal Justice Initiative, similar to the Innocence Project and the Midwest Innocence Project. Stevenson’s book has become a most respectable film, the kind that forces a sob to rise from the heart at the end as captions explain what happened after the last scene fades to black.

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WEEK IN WOMEN: WarnerMedia Launches Inclusion Initiative – Brandy McDonnell reports

Six months after best actress winner Frances McDormand delivered a figurative mic drop at the Oscars by championing the idea of inclusion riders, WarnerMedia – including Warner Bros., HBO and Turner — has announced a company-wide policy outlining its commitment to diversity and inclusion in front of and behind the camera.

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