CAPERNAUM – Review by Nikki Baughan

Joining a host of recent works of both fact and fiction – such as Sudabeh Mortezai’s Joy and Gabrielle Brady’s Island Of The Hungry Ghosts – which highlight the refugee crisis engulfing the globe, Capernaum is a gut-punch reminder that the rise of isolationist politics is leaving swathes of human casualties in its wake. Devastating but utterly essential cinema

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CAPERNAUM – Rreview by Susan Wloszczyna

Capernaum is part Oliver Twist, part Slumdog Millionaire, but with only a modicum of a fairy-tale ending. Much like last year’s The Florida Project, children pay a high price when their impoverished circumstances are the result of selfish adults who lead careless lives. The difference is that Zain (played by Zain Al Rafeea), the streetwise 12-year-old Lebanese boy who barely has room to sleep amongst his countless siblings, is playing a real-life version of himself.

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CAPERNAUM – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

Capernaum is an angry cry, through the character of Zain, for people to pay attention to and do something about the misery of others. Labaki’s greatest achievement may be that she made a beautifully crafted film with such a deep understanding for her untrained actors that it’s nearly impossible to tear our eyes from the screen or forget what we’ve witnessed.

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PIONEERS: FIRST WOMEN FILMMAKERS – Review by Cate Marquis

Women filmmakers are getting a lot of attention now but many don’t know that women directors were among cinema’s first, and the best. Now we get a chance to explore that forgotten history, as Kino Lorber is offering Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers, a six-disc box set of some of the best films by women directors in cinema’s early decades.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK November 9, 2018: HERE AND NOW

motw logo 1-35Introspective and contemplative, Fabien Constant’s drama Here and Now follows talented singer Vivienne (Sarah Jessica Parker) through roughly 24 hours after she’s diagnosed with a serious form of brain cancer and learns she may have no more than 14 months left to live. With everything from her upcoming tour to her time with her teenage daughter now up in the air, Vivienne struggles to come to terms with this unexpected twist of fate.

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HERE AND NOW – Review by Loren King

How would a day unfold when it starts with a doctor delivering a grim diagnosis? That’s the premise of Here and Now, a modest but affecting drama written by playwright and House of Cards scribe Laura Eason. It’s an intimate character study that rests on the lead performance from Sarah Jessica Parker.

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HERE AND NOW – Review by Nikki Baughan

Writer Laura Eason’s screenplay effectively mines the anonymity and isolation of modern life, where people connect more easily through technology than face-to-face; we often see Vivienne surrounded by people but utterly, desperately alone. And if Fabien Constant’s direction sometimes over-eggs the pudding, the emotional truth of the story, and Parker’s nuanced, sympathetic performance, prevent it from straying too far into melodrama.

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HERE AND NOW – Review by Liz Whittemore

Sarah Jessica Parker gives her career-best performance in this awe-inspiring look at life and regret. The film shines in its sound editing. Parker comes to life in an entirely different way when there is no dialogue at all. Here and Now is also a living, breathing homage to New York City in sight and sound. This film was one of the best at Tribeca Film Festival this year.

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CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME? – Review by Diane Carson

Can You Ever Forgive Me? highlights Melissa McCarthy’s dramatic gifts. We who know Melissa McCarthy as a brilliantly talented comedic actress will expand our categorization with her dramatic performance in Can You Ever Forgive Me? McCarthy plays the real-life Lee Israel, in her fifties, living in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, eking out a living writing biographical histories. Tough times and her abrasive personality propel her into a downturn.

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