3 FACES – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

Since the Iranian government imposed a 20-year filmmaking ban on Jafar Panahi in 2010, the scrappy director has made and smuggled out four films, including his latest, 3 Faces. The irrepressible Panahi is critical of Iran’s repressions against women and continues to plead for their freedom in this farcical, subversive film.

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3 FACES – Review by Jennifer Merin

Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi has been banned by the Iranian government from making movies for 20 years, yet he always invents creative ways to practice his craft by documenting his own interactions with actors and ‘civilians.’ In 3 Faces Panahi and actress Behnaz Jafari take to the road to try too solve a mystery about what happened to a young woman who wanted to escape her traditional family to become an actress. The plot twists itself into an intriguing mystery about weather the girl is alive or dead.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK March 1, 2018: SAINT JUDY

SAINT JUDY is director Sean Hanish’s fact-based drama about immigration attorney Judy Wood (Michelle Monaghan), whose tenacity, empathy, and intelligence

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SAINT JUDY – Review by Loren King

There’s an urgency and a poignancy to the timing of this fact-based drama. With the current president and his base bent on creating border walls, Saint Judy is the eye-opening story of Los Angeles lawyer Judy Wood (Michelle Monaghan) and her dogged efforts on behalf of immigrants, especially women, seeking political asylum in the US due to the threat of violence and murder in the patriarchal countries they fled.

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WOMAN AT WAR – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

Woman at War is about a 49-year-old Iceland native named Halla (Hallodora Geirharodottir) who by day is a joy-filled choir director and tai chi enthusiast who has portraits of Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandala hanging in her living room. But make no mistake. She is indeed a warrior on a mission to save Mother Earth, as she regularly sabotages an aluminum plant that is helping to destroy the environment.

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WOMAN AT WAR – Review by Cate Marquis

In the Icelandic film Woman at War, an attractive, fit, middle-aged Icelandic woman Halla (Hallora Geirhardsdottir) uses her skill with a bow, like a real-life Katniss Everdeen, to knock out power lines. Her goal is to disable an aluminum smelter owned by multinational corporations, who plan to bring in more polluting heavy industry.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK February 15, 2019: DAUGHTER OF MINE

motw logo 1-35A passionate exploration of the nature of motherhood, daughterhood, and connection, Laura Bispuri’s Daughter of Mine has a raw, naturalistic feel that makes its characters and their choices seem very real. Viewers are plunged right into the world of two Italian women who both lay claim to a young girl who finds herself torn between them.

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WHO WILL WRITE OUR HISTORY – Review by Cate Marquis

There has been concern that public awareness of the Holocaust is declining, particularly among younger people, which makes the documentary Who Will Write Our History timely now. Director Roberta Grossman’s moving documentary is especially well-suited to the task, as it focuses on a secret group in the Warsaw Ghetto, led by a Polish Jewish historian, who set out to create a history and record of Jewish culture, to counteract the version of Jewish life they saw Nazi propaganda creating.

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CAPERNAUM – Review by Diane Carson

The title of Lebanon’s submission for a Best Foreign Film Oscar is Capernaum, literally the name of a fishing village on the Sea of Galilea in Biblical Palestine. More appropriate to events in director Nadine Labaki’s film, Capernaum signifies, as the subtitle states, chaos, that is, disorder, a state of anarchical disarray. The twelve-year-old protagonist Zain would surely agree.

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RUST CREEK – Review by Cate Marquis

Rust Creek is a genre film, aiming just to entertain, and there is no reason women directors can’t make those kinds of films too rather than ones with social commentary. And there is enough there in Rust Creek, largely thanks to the cast, to give the promise of an intriguing crime story – enough to make you frustrated when the film takes wrongs turns.

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