IS LOVE ENOUGH SIR? – Review by Mythilly Ramachandran (Guest Post)

Is Love Enough Sir? is a tale of forbidden love. Rohena Gera marks her debut with a heart- warming and poignant story that holds a mirror to the class divide in India. “People will make fun of us,” Ratna says while acknowledging her feelings for Ashwin. “I don’t care,” he tells her. But she cares. In Hindi. Streaming on Netflix

Read more

THE DIG – Review by Susan Granger

Set in 1939 in the countryside as England was on the brink of W.W.II, this period drama stars Carey Mulligan (“Promising Young Woman”) as wealthy, widowed Lady Edith Pretty who believes there are historical artifacts buried on her estate, known as Sutton Hoo, near the River Deben.

Read more

MALCOLM AND MARIE – Review by Martha K Baker

The titular pugilists have retired to their glass house after the premiere of Malcolm’s movie. Wifelike Marie prepares mac ‘n’ cheese for her hungry man while he teases apart the evening.. Malcolm and Marie is Friday Night Fights without ring, gloves, or bloody blows. Love and hate pound a tattoo throughout and as terraced dynamics in Liberation over the credits.

Read more

THE DIG – Review by Diane Carson

Australian director Simon Stone achieves two worthy goals. First, he dramatically chronicles the 1939 discovery and unearthing of the imprint of an eighty-six foot long, sixth-century burial ship found beneath one mound at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, on England’s east coast. Second, he makes archeology fascinating, thanks in large part to an economical script and understated performances.

Read more

LUPIN – Review by April Neale

Lupin, The French import on Netflix, is a must see binge, immédiatement!
The five episode series percolates with an energy rarely felt in television fare and is a familiar theme of injustice and abuse of power. The story of one man’s path to clearing his father’s name becomes a crackling great caper thrill ride with a hell of a cliffhanger.

Read more

THE WHITE TIGER – Review by Diane Carson

Tackling India’s repressive, inflexible caste system, The White Tiger chronicles Balram Halwai’s fawning deference, growing resentment, and eventual violent rejection of his submissive station. Adapted from Aravind Adiga’s 2008 Man Booker Prize winning novel, director Ramin Bahrani manages to create a quirky, even occasionally and unexpectedly amusing presentation of Balram’s abject subservience evolving into self-assured entitlement.

Read more

BRIDGERTON – Review by Susan Granger

While Netflix’s Bridgerton sprawling mini-series may seem like Gossip Girl-meets-Downton Abbey, it’s unique in reimagining 19th century Britain with aristocratic families seeking favor from Black royalty. Produced by Shonda Rhimes, it’s fun, frothy escapism. According to showrunner Chris Van Dusen, regarding that era’s excess, beauty and decadence: “It was over-the-top: the costumes, the jewels, the glittering ballrooms, the country homes.”

Read more

TWO WAYS HOME – Review by Diane Carson

In Two Ways Home, director Ron Vignone addresses a prevalent, persistent issue. How does a bipolar individual, working toward self-respect, gain understanding, much less acceptance, by people unfamiliar with the condition? Add to this challenge a young woman, identified only as Kathy, recently released from prison and now returning to her rural Iowa home and hostile relatives, including her very angry twelve-year-old daughter Cori.

Read more

MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM – Review by Susan Granger

George Wolfe’s well-timed production is a lavish adaptation of August Wilson’s thinly-plotted 1984 play that vividly depicts how dismissively Black musicians were treated back then and how some “existed in defiance of their time.” Known as the “Mother of the Blues,” hip-swaying, sweat-slicked Ma Rainey (Viola Davis) bristles when her opportunistic manager and record producer don’t show the diva proper respect.

Read more

MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM – Review by Martha K Baker

Ma Rainey, the Mother of the Blues, stands in the spotlight serenading the Black Bottom, a Twenties’ dance. But August Wilson put her there, and this film version of his play pays homage to him as much as it does to her. A third honor in this fine film goes to Chadwick Boseman in his last remarkable role.

Read more