STRAYS – Review by T.J. Callahan

What a dog. I’m going to just cut to the chase, Strays is pawsitivley obnoxious. The trailer shows cute K9s navigating life, but what you don’t realize is writer, Dan Perrault (American Vandals) is relying on school boy, lift your leg humor to fuel this film. Strays: When you pee on something, it’s yours. If you go in not expecting much, you’ll likely wag your tail.

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SHORTCOMINGS – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Ben (Justin H. Min) is a spectacular dickhead. He’s tactless, arrogant, selfish and mean. And in Randall Park’s directorial debut Shortcomings, Ben is about to become the main character of a film where he finds out that not everything always necessarily revolves around him. Beginning with an undisguised parody of Crazy Rich Asians to which Ben has an emphatically negative reaction, Shortcomings wears its discourse on its sleeve. But this is Ben’s story, and as an objectively awful person it’s no small accomplishment that we care so much to join him on his journey.

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SHORTCOMINGS – Review by T.J. Callahan

Shortcomings is based on a graphic novel by Adrian Tomine and is helmed by Fresh Off the Boat’s Randall Park. This is the sitcom stars’ first foray into directing and he keeps the storyline floating and cruises into the dock at a taut one and a half hours. That seems hard to do these days. What is refreshing about Shortcomings is it focuses on real life struggles of not just Asian-Americans, but all nationalities of people who just want to succeed and be loved. Characters sometimes come up short, but it has nothing to do with their height.

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ALWAYS BE MY MAYBE – Review by Sheila Roberts

Netflix’s new Rom-com, Always Be My Maybe, is a refreshing love story smartly directed by Nahnatchka Khan in her feature debut, starring the charming Ali Wong and Randall Park as childhood sweethearts who part ways after a spat then bump into each other 15 years later. Wong and Park deliver sparkling performances as Sasha and Marcus who now live in vastly different worlds and share little in common — or so they think.

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