HIT MAN – Review by Serena Seghedoni

Hit Man’s protagonist is Gary Johnson, an extremely ordinary psychology and philosophy university professor whom you’d barely notice if you passed him on the street. But Gary has a side job, as he collaborates with the New Orleans Police in his spare time, helping them catch prospective offenders. And, when we first meet him, he’s just been promoted from “man in the van” to “contract killer.” In other words, his new role requires him to meet with ordinary people looking to hire a hit man and get their requests on tape, so that the cops can arrest them.

Read more

WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE – Review by Susan Granger

Richard Linklater’s adaptation of Maria Semple’s 2012 best-seller doesn’t make a smooth transition to the screen.
Semple’s anarchic, non-linear story revolves around an affluent, if eccentric, middle-aged woman who submerges her identity with that of her family, losing her sense of self. On paper, her daughter’s inner thoughts propel the narrative. On-film, this doesn’t work.

Read more

WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE – Review by Lana Wilson-Combs

In Director and Screenwriter Richard Linklater’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette,Cate Blanchett stars as the title character, Bernadette Fox, a well-respected Los Angeles architect who was on top of the world until a series of unfortunate events turned her life upside down. When Bernadette unexpectedly disappears from home, her husband (Billy Crudup) and young daughter, Bee (Emma Nelson) set out on an exciting adventure to find her, while Bernadette does some soul-searching of her own.

Read more

AWFJ Movie of the Week, July 7-13: BOYHOOD

Opening July 11, the AWFJ Movie of the Week is Boyhood, writer-director Richard Linklater’s audacious, groundbreaking feature. Filmed over a 12 year span with the same cast, the movie presents snapshots of family life—birthdays, vacations and family dinners—backed by a soundtrack that captures the recent cultural milieu with tunes from Coldplay to Arcade Fire. This film’s unique portrait of growing up opens a door for personal introspection unlike any film before. Read on….

Read more