FINAL CUT – Review by Leslie Combemale

In Final Cut, Michel Hazanavicius’ French-i-fied remake of One Cut of the Dead, the premise is both simple and very complicated. Director Rémi (Romain Duris, definitely MVP of the film), is known for his productions being cheap and decent. He is approached by producers of a new channel, “Z”, to make a low-budget, one-take, 30-odd minute zombie movie. He accepts, and all hell, and accompanying zombies, break loose on the day of the shoot. That’s the simple part. The more complicated part is the layered storytelling, and how reality and fiction overlap. That’s all any critic should say if they want to keep their review spoiler-free.

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EIFFEL – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

We’ve all looked at skyscrapers thrusting tall and proud into the unsuspecting sky and snorted to think of what was subconsciously driving the (inevitably male) architects. Right? Of course we have. Yet I cannot think of a single film before this one that takes our presumptions and seems to say, “Yes, heh heh, yesssss,” with a glint in its eye.

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EIFFEL – Review by Martha K Baker

You have to see Eiffel to decide if the film is corny fiction or a romantic narrative feature. Watching it is not difficult, given the seductive scenes of heaving bosoms and rising monuments. It’s just that “Eiffel” can be seen as a partial biography of a great engineer or as gooey romance made up to fill out a science story.

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, July 14-20: MOOD INDIGO

Opening July 18, the AWFJ Movie of the Week is Michel Gondry’s Mood Indigo, a unique love story that incorporates fantastical, surreal elements. Gondry’s stylishly quirky fantasy world includes a piano that makes cocktails, a dining room on rollerskates and a cloud-shaped vehicle. Boris Vian’s eponymous cult novel provides the inspiration for the film, which stars Audrey Tautou and Romain Duris as lovers whose whirlwind affair is threatened when a flower begins to grow in her lungs. It’s the kind of twist that fits perfectly well with Gondry’s inventive imagination. Read on…

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