ROSIE (TIFF 2022) – Review by Jennifer Green

Here’s an example of a film whose heart is in the right place but whose characters and storyline probably sounded deeper on paper than they come across on film. The 80s-era Montréal setting also had a lot of promise. Keris Hope Hill in the role of the titular young Rosie could not be cuter, and her little-girl energy (spinning and singing and dancing) is totally true to life. Her openness to loving her makeshift new family and learning about her Cree culture are the film’s high points.

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ROSIE – Review by Loren King

Rosie blends human heartbreak and social realism. Anyone living even remotely close to the edge likely understands that homelessness isn’t a moral failing but a widespread social problem created by economics and greed. But scripter Doyle and director Breathnach don’t preach or moralize; they’ve told a complicated story with elegant simplicity.

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ROSIE – Review by Martha K Baker

Rosie presents real life in a car. Roddy Doyle knows a little something about families that are down and close to out. He wrote The Commitments, The Snapper, and The Van. Each book, story, and/or screenplay is about Irish folks who have hit the penultimate rung with a bounce. Doyle’s works have two things in common: hope and stubbornness.

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