ARGYLLE – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

I startled myself awake the morning after my screening with the shocking realization that nothing in the trailer — which has been ubiquitous and inescapable at cinemas for months now — is actually in the damn movie. Or is it? Maybe some of it is? The movie itself had already faded from memory, mere hours later, it’s that blah…

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ARGYLLE – Review by Susan Kamyab

Most critics don’t seem to be fans of Matthew Vaughn’s new action comedy, Argylle, but luckily, I’m in the minority of those who had a blast with it. The film is about an introverted spy novelist played by Bryce Dallas Howard, who is drawn into the activities of a sinister underground organization. It’s best to not take this film too seriously. Just allow yourself to enjoy the ridiculous ride. Argylle is a fast-paced, witty, and action-packed spy comedy that’s well worth seeing on the big screen.

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ARGYLLE – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

With director Matthew Vaughn, best known for Kick-Ass and the Kingsman films, one expects foolishness. This isn’t Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy—or even The Spy Who Loved Me. Argylle is preposterous and messy, but I’ve seen worse, and without the good cheer of Bryce Dallas Howard and Sam Rockwell. It’s pitched at a heightened reality with cartoonish stunts, over-the-top action, zany dance choreography, and disco music. I doubt I’ll see another sequence this year with someone on jerry-rigged knife-blade ice skates slaying enemies in a sit-spin, or people twirling in a gunfight among smoke canisters that bloom into technicolor hearts.

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ARGYLLE – Review by T. J. Callahan

“The greater the spy, the bigger the lie.” This is a great way to describe the new action thriller, Argylle. No one is who they say they are…or are they? Everyone is a double, triple or even quadruple agent in this well choreographed Dancing with the Spies espionage escapade.

Argylle is the title character in a series of spy novels written by the reclusive Ella Conway, played by Bryce Dallas Howard. After Aiden, a real secret agent (Sam Rockwell), shows up at her door ready to save her and her beloved cat, Alfie, from almost certain death, Ella realizes the plot of the new book she’s writing is mirroring real world events in real time. But are they predictions or are they memories?

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THE MARVELS – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

The Marvels is the loopiest Marvel Studios movie this side of The Guardians of the Galaxy films, with three leads whose company is a joy. It’s also the kind of film where it’s best not to overthink. The villain’s murky motives take time to gel, and there’s word salad for some dialogue, but at its best moments, it’s an entertaining lark with genuine humor and endearing enthusiasm.

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THE HITMAN’S WIFE’S BODYGUARD – Review by Brandy McDonnell

The tiresome sequel “The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard” wastes its star power as cavalierly as its aggressively unlikeable characters waste ammunition. It takes an almost impressive feat of sheer mediocrity to make a movie starring Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson, Salma Hayek, Antonio Banderas and Morgan Freeman this annoying.

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THE BANKER – Review by Diane Carson

The Banker powerfully presents 1950s racism. In this truth-based narrative, blatant racism is, refreshingly, never sugar coated, always directly addressed, and leads to a question put to to the US Senate. “Why is it so important to you to exclude an entire race of people from the American dream?”

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SHAFT – Review by Lynnette Nicholas

John Shaft’s no-nonsense, street-style of fighting crime, coupled with JJ’s (aka John Shaft, Jr) millennial political-correctness, cyber smarts and sensitive consideration for the humanity in others makes for an interesting and dynamic storyline that is sure to create nostalgia for the original Shaft films, while instilling a newfound respect for the Shaft franchise in current millennial audiences.

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GLASS – Review by Brandy McDonnell

With the help of arbitrary deadlines, handy coincidences and characters explaining comic book tropes, Shyamalan attempts a series of elaborate plot twists – of course – that he doesn’t quite pull off cleanly but that are still pretty nifty and unveil some interesting surprises. Herculean performances by McAvoy, Willis and Jackson keep “Glass” watchable even when the narrative gets murky.

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