THE PINK CLOUD – Review by Leslie Combemale

At this point in the pandemic, most of us have become acutely aware of the relative saving graces and limitations of technology as a tool for communication and authentic interaction. We’ve learned isolation can birth intense loneliness and depression. There is no substitute for human physical interaction, and there likely never will be. This truth wound up particularly if unintentionally hitting home in the new Brazilian sci-fi character drama The Pink Cloud. That The Pink Cloud reflects this moment in history makes it heartbreaking and fascinating cinema.

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NIGHT RAIDERS – Review by Karen Peterson

Night Raiders fictionalizes the tragic history of Indigenous people and uses it as a condemnation, but also to show survival, hope, and a way forward. Looking deeper, the film uses the specific history of atrocities against Indigenous people from around the world to vanquish the concept that cultural homogeneity and that world of complete unity of language, ideology, religion, etc, destroys society rather than strengthens it. At a time where “groupthink” and echo chambers are valued, Danis Goulet shows us there are better ways to live and work together.

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SEE – Review by Susan Granger

This dystopian sci-fi fantasy/drama series begins its second season with a third already in production. The opening credits are a montage of nerve endings that, as the volume increases, form various shapes. As star Alfre Woodward notes: “The characters in season two do not see the past coming to haunt them, but the past coming to be resolved…See has so many parallels with what is going on with the world – or even what could happen. There’s the idea of the masses laying trust in prophetic figures.”

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THE NEVERS – Review by Susan Granger

Set in London in 1896 during the last years of Queen Victoria’s reign, this new HBO six-episode, sci-fi series revolves around ‘Touched’ people – mostly women – who suddenly manifest an astonishing variety of abnormal abilities. The phenomenon begins with a spectral glow in the overcast sky as glittering particles fall to Earth. Suddenly, young women, many from the lower classes, demonstrate mysterious capabilities – so extraordinary that they’re considered threatening by wealthy, aristocratic men.

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STOWAWAY – Review by Susan Granger

Set sometime in the future when interplanetary travel is possible, Joe Penna’s sci-fi thriller poses provocative moral questions when an accidental stowaway compromises a vessel’s oxygen supply. As the story begins, the Kingfisher crew – working for a company called Hyperion – blasts off for a two-year mission to Mars. Not long after takeoff, they discover a terrified interloper, a launch support engineer who was trapped in an overhead compartment.

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Lindsey Morgan on SKYLINES, Sci-fi and Soaps – Marina Antunes interviews

Actress Lindsey Morgan is best known for her turn on TV’s long-running The 100 but the fan favourite is not only concentrating on TV. Skylines, the third instalment in writer/director Liam O’Donnell’s ongoing sci-fi saga, stars Morgan as Rose, an ass-kicking badass who is charged with taking the fight to the alien planet in hopes of saving what’s left of humanity. While quite different from Morgan’s previous roles, Skylines gave the actress the opportunity to mix her passion for kickboxing, something she had been pursuing on her own, with acting; not to mention the opportunity to lead a cast of international stars.

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PARALLEL – Review by Susan Granger

This Canadian sci-fi thriller has a clever premise: four young people discover a portal to multi-universes. In the fantasy prologue, there’s a glimpse of Marissa (Kathleen Quinlan) and her doppleganger. Then in Seattle, faced with an outrageously demanding deadline that’s rapidly approaching, four aspiring techies are living in a rented house so they can work 24/7 on their innovative parking app.

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LX 2048 – Review by Susan Granger

It’s the year 2048 and mankind still hasn’t figured out if there’s life after death. But there is a new insurance program called Premium 3 for parents of three children or more. If you or your spouse dies during child-rearing years, a clone will take your place. Not only will this clone will have all the memories and knowledge to raise your children but the surviving spouse can ‘tailor’ it to preferred specifications – making it “better.”

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MNEMORPHRENIA – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

For a low-budget debut feature, Mnemophrenia punches well above its weight; like some of the best genre films, manages to do hell of a lot with very little. There are clearly large philosophical questions under the microscope here about human evolution, empathy, technology and ethics, and it and prompts reflection about our relationship to visual culture and the moving image in particular.

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COLOR OUT OF SPACE – Review by Susan Granger

Inspired by a 1927 H.P. Lovecraft short story, this sci-fi terror tale revolves around former city dwellers – Nathan (Nicolas Cage) and Theresa (Joely Richardson) Gardner – who have moved to the country with their three children: Lavinia (Madeline Arthur), Benny (Brendan Meyer) and Jack (Jullian Hilliard). Sound relatable?

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