PET SEMATARY: BLOODLINES – Review by Nadine Whitney

Stephen King’s novel Pet Sematary has been adapted for the screen three times. The 1989 version by Mary Lambert which was co-scripted by King, which was followed by a 1992 sequel. In 2019 another adaptation was directed by Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer. Acting as a prequel to the 2019 version, Lindsey Anderson Beer’s Pet Sematary: Bloodlines concentrates on the character of the young Jud Crandall who had been previously played as an old man by Fred Gwynne and John Lithgow. Jud Crandall is the man who leads Louis Creed to the titular Pet Sematary and the sour land beyond. Beer’s film attempts to solve the mystery of Ludlow, Maine and why death is different there.

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Lindsey Anderson Beer talks Women in Horror, Stephen King and PET SEMATARY: BLOODLINES – Nadine Whitney interviews

Although she’s making her directorial debut with Pet Sematary: Bloodlines, Lindsey Anderson Beer has worked in the screen industry for years as writer, show runner, story consultant and more. With Pet Sematary: Bloodline, she’s expanded the vision of super horror creative Stephen King. As she puts it: My goal with anything is always delightful surprise and I hope the film feels like something they haven’t seen before. I hope it offers them the heart and the moral questions of Pet Sematary and I want it to scare the shit out of people. I also want it to make them feel something.

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KING ON SCREEN – Review by Jennifer Green

What starts out appearing as a film only for diehard Stephen King fans, King on Screen transforms over its 105 minutes into a broader rumination on the challenges of adapting the written word to the visual language of cinema and the role horror can play as a genre in people’s lives. When you’re talking about best-selling works by a beloved author like King, the responsibility heightens. An interesting thread in this documentary is the analysis of the role horror can play as a genre in some people’s lives. Interviewees describe horror as a means to put order into chaos, to exercise courage and practice being brave in safe spaces.

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THE BLACK PHONE – Review by T. J. Callahan

Set in 1978 Denver, an abducted teenager uses an unplugged wall phone in a sound proof basement crypt to communicate with a sadistic killer’s previous victims in hopes of saving his own life. The Black Phone is a perplexing puzzle that won’t leave you hanging…up. It won’t necessarily have you on the edge of your seat either, but that’s only because The Black Phone is more creepy than it is frightening. It’s more like watching a crime drama with jump scares.

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FIRESTARTER – Review by Susan Kamyab

This 2022 of version Firestarter is just another flop to add to the list of Stephen King adaptations. For those who haven’t seen the original 1984 film, the story follows a young couple and their 11-year-old daughter. Charlie. Due to past lab experiments, the three of them have telekinetic powers. Charlie’s parents have learned to control theirs, but she is unable to contain her sudden burst of flames triggered by anger. But that’s the least of this family’s problems, as a mysterious federal agent is on the hunt to take Charlie away from her parents. From begin to end the film never ignites a big enough flame.

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