WELCOME TO MARWEN – Review by Susan Granger

In recent years, visionary filmmaker Robert Zemeckis has become obsessed with experimental technology, particularly motion-capture animation. Now he turns his attention to the fantasyland created by an eccentric artist. Clumsily scripted by Zemeckis and Caroline Thompson, the film depicts Mark’s perverted perception of the world, superficially skimming over how he arrived at his point of view.

Read more

WELCOME TO MARWEN – Review by Martha K. Baker

Welcome to Marwen is dark and deep. For those who saw the 2010 documentary, Marwencol, the feature film is a welcome back with “welcome” used advisedly. It’s hard to feel welcomed to a world that, although therapeutic for one man, is strange for visitors. Both films are creepy, a little, and the feature film is dark and hard, a lot.

Read more

VICE – Review by Diane Carson

Vice presents a wild, irreverent ride through Dick Cheney’s life. Writer/director Adam McKay tackles Dick Cheney’s public and private life head on in Vice, a title with provocative insinuations far beyond Cheney’s years 2001 to 2009 as President’s George W. Bush’s Vice President. After introductory, amusing text on screen, the story proper begins in Caspar, Wyoming, in 1963 with a speedy, loud opening scene of Dick stopped for drunk driving.

Read more

BEAUTIFUL BOY – Review by Susan Granger

This is the true story of a frantic father dealing with his son’s crystal methamphetamine addiction. Set in Northern California, it revolves around veteran Marin County journalist David Sheff (Steve Carell), who lives with his troubled 18 year-old son Nic (Timothee Chalamet) from previous marriage, his second wife Karen (Maura Tierney) and their two young kids.

Read more

BEAUTIFUL BOY – Review by Martha K. Baker

Beautiful Boy proves hard and essential to watch. Who’s going to see this earnest film? Drug addicts? Their siblings? Their parents. Maybe advocates and therapists and counselors? Beautiful Boy conflates two books by the father of the beautiful boy and the title character himself. The one is the paternal protector, the other the addict.

Read more