GOLDEN YEARS – Review by Lois Alter Mark

Sustaining a marriage is hard. Making a good movie about sustaining a marriage may be even harder – which makes the Swiss feature, Golden Years, such a delightful surprise. Director Barbara Kulcsar and screenwriter Petra Volpe have created a crowd pleaser that is universally relatable even if you’re watching with subtitles. The German language film is, at turns, funny, heartbreaking, frustrating and enlightening and it rings so true, all long-term couples are likely to see pieces of themselves in it. After being married for decades, Peter and Alice are finally going to have time to relax together. Peter is retiring and, at a big party celebrating the milestone, their kids gift them a romantic Mediterranean cruise. Alice is excited about this opportunity to rekindle the spark that seems to have gone out of their relationship but Peter just wants to stay home.

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GOLDEN YEARS – Review by Liz Braun

It’s rare to see older adults on the big screen. That’s the main draw in Barbara Kulcsar’s Golden Years, a film about love, aging and leading an authentic life. The story, written by Petra Volpe, is centred on Alice (Esther Gemsch) and Peter (Stefan Kurt), a Swiss couple married 42 years. Alice makes a break for her own personal freedom, taking a time-out from her marriage and from relying on Peter to somehow complete her. Golden Years suffers from the uneasy relationship between the jokey bits and the drama of accepting solitude. But what do we know? Golden Years has won audience awards and similar accolades on the festival circuit

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TRAINED TO SEE: THREE WOMEN AND THE WAR – Review by Nadine Whitney

Some of the most poignant images and reporting from the frontlines of war come from women war correspondents. Women created some of iconic photographs from WWII; from the triumphantly patriotic to the weary angst of soldiers dying in leagues on the front lines, to the sorrowful and horrifying pictures of concentration camps and the victims of the Holocaust. Swiss director Luzia Schmid concentrates on three remarkable women — Lee Miller, Martha Gellhorn, and Margaret Bourke-White — who battled not only sexist bureaucracy and the notion that women were too feeble to be allowed access to battles (unless as nurses) to create some of the most important reporting and visual records of the period. Trained to See is a brilliant visual and narrated document that brings the perspective of ground-breaking professional woman to the fore.

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Luzia Schmid on TRAINED TO SEE, Women Photographers and War – Nadine Whitney interviews

Luzia Schmid is a seasoned reporter, director, documentarian, and teacher based in Switzerland. Her previous work includes Lost in Libera and Groundspeed. Schmid’s Trained to See: Three Women and the War is a brilliant and timely documentary focusing on Lee Miller, Martha Gellhorn, and Margaret Bourke-White, three trailblazing women photojournalists whose reporting from the front lines of WWII created a new form of war journalism.

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MY WONDERFUL WANDA – Review by Lois Alter Mark

My Wonderful Wanda is such a trip, you’re better off not knowing much about the movie ahead of time so you can just let writer-director, Bettina Oberli, take you for a ride. Because, oh, what a ride it is. Oberli has created a satire that gets to the heart of family dynamics, privilege, motherhood, class – and lack of it. In so many ways, My Wonderful Wanda is pretty wonderful.

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MY LITTLE SISTER -Review by Valerie Kalfrin

My Little Sister, Switzerland’s entry for the foreign language Oscar category, ostensibly lets audiences peek inside the complex relationship between fraternal twins as one struggles with cancer. While that’s a poignant part of this tender drama, the film’s underlying story is more about how much the titular sister gives to everyone but herself.

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