THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING – Review by Martha K Baker

It is a maxim of good writing to show rather tell. That rule applies especially to telling stories. But what about a movie based on the art of story-telling? A movie is all about showing — after all, it’s called “show” business. Breaking this rule causes Three Thousand Years of Longing to be sadly mediocre.

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THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING – Review by Susan Granger

George Miller’s Three Thousand Years of Longing delves into the thought-provoking power of fantasy and storytelling. Adapted from The Djinn and the Nightingale’s Eye, it’s scripted as a cautionary tale by director George Miller and his daughter, Augusta Gore, with exquisite vignettes, exploring themes of fate, loneliness and the universal desire for connection. With superb comedic timing, Tilda Swinton and Idris Elba play off each other perfectly.

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THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF LONGING (MIFF 2022) – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

And so, the meme-ification of Tilda Swinton continues. She can act, sure – she can act the living shit out of it – but Swinton’s star persona is surely at a point now where one finds it difficult to ever shake the presence of the actor herself, leaving the poor character she’s playing somewhere in her shadow. There’s no arguing that Swinton can act, but for myself at least, I sometimes wish I could watch a film where her star presence suffocates her characters with slightly less intensity.

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THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD -Review by Susan Granger

Intrigued by the title? I was too, particularly since 2020 marks the 150th year since the death of Charles Dickens, but it’s certainly not the semi-autobiographical tale that I remember. Scottish director Armando Iannucci’s revisionist version begins in 1850 in a London theater, where David Copperfield (Dev Patel) addresses the audience, speculating on whether he’ll turn out to be the hero of his own life.

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THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD – Brandy McDonnell reviews

The ever-versatile Oscar nominee Dev Patel leads a terrifically talented troupe selected through colorblind or nontraditional casting, a practice still more common in modern-day theater than filmmaking. It’s refreshingly lovely to see outstanding actors of color like Patel, Benedict Wong and Nikki Amuka-Bird bring the classic novel’s characters to life.

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THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD – Review by Martha K Baker

Director Iannucci and writer Simon Blackwell are known for cursing and biting satire. Here, however, they lean on Dickens. Cramming a beloved, 800-pp. novel into a 2-hour film does not work totally. The cast may have had fun exercising, but the audience will be left longing for a few of Iannucci’s signature F-bombs to spice up this interpretation.

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WOMEN MAKE FILM – Review by Diane Carson

In Women Make Film, writer/director Mark Cousins has shouldered a monumental task. First, he promises A New Road Movie Through Cinema by looking “at film through the eyes of women filmmakers.” Second, he’ll accomplish this in forty chapters, not devoted to directors’ lives, not chronologically organized, and not exploring ways women are different from male filmmakers, though that emerges implicitly.

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THE DEAD DON’T DIE – Review by Brandy McDonnell

Between the nifty way the zombies collapse into piles of ash when beheaded and the committed performances by Tilda Swinton, playing a Scottish mortician and samurai warrior, and Tom Waits, as a cantankerous hermit determined to stay out of the carnage, “The Dead Don’t Die” offers just barely enough deadpan humor and quirky characters to keep it interesting until the credits roll.

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