ENDANGERED (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Martha K Baker

“Governments attacking journalists are not new.” That is but one of the quotations to take home from Endangered, an HBO Documentary on the status of the press today. Other meaty quotations range from screams at reporters that “You are the enemy of the people!” to tempered analyses by the reporters themselves, such as, “This profound crisis is not going away.”

Read more

HIDDEN LETTERS (Tribeca 2022) – Reviewed by Marilyn Ferdinand

In their very moving documentary, Hidden Letters, directors Violet Du Feng and Qing Zhao show how generations of Chinese women found cracks in their oppressive, patriarchal society and created a way to find a small ray of sunshine in an otherwise bleak existence. Their strategy? Nushu, a private language they invented to write letters to each other to share their pain and gain comfort in communion.

Read more

McENROE (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Marilyn Ferdinand

Every moment of documentary director/screenwriter Barney Douglas’ film contains interesting information from famous eye witnesses, including other tennis greats, as well as from an open and honest John McEnroe. This film is vital viewing for anyone who wants to see and understand the achievements and heart of this champion.

Read more

LEAVE NO TRACE (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Leslie Combemale

When Norman Rockwell began his long association with The Boy Scouts of American, he couldn’t possibly have imagined how much his romanticized, clean-cut, patriotic representation of the organization would aid in building a system tailor-made for pedophiles. The dozens of art images shown as part of the new documentary Leave No Trace are only one way filmmaker Irene Taylor lays out how the once storied, now infamous boy’s club promoted and branded itself as a safe, wholesome way to create a strong, healthy, loyal, and obedient young man. Leave No Trace recounts, often in shocking ways, just how far from the truth that really is, and has been nearly from their inception. Only in February 2022, the Boy Scouts of America reached a 2.7 billion agreement over sexual abuses that occurred over decades.

Read more

WE MIGHT AS WELL BE DEAD (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Leslie Combemale

Paranoia and tribalism reign supreme in writer/director Natalia Sinelnikova’s debut feature We Might As Well Be Dead, a satire about how fear is leading to chosen isolation, elitism, and a general inclination to cocoon with the like-minded, rather than consider alternate points of view. The elite family at the center of the tory faces an undefined outside threat that symbolizes the paranoia of the unknown and xenophobia that have been fomented by politicians across the world in recent years. We Might As Well Be Dead leverages that dread to great effect, showing a promising start to Sinelnikiva’s career.

Read more

IN HER NAME (Tribeca 2022) – Review by Leslie Combemale

There are some deep subjects examined in writer/director Sarah Carter’s relationship dramedy about family dynamics, In Her Name. Questions like, “Who told you who you are, and how attached to that are you?” and “Do you want to hold on to your anger more than you want to be free?” haunt the characters. Viewers could hardly be blamed for questioning whether Carter and her cast will be able to perform the exorcism required to release them from their possession. That they achieve a sort of release, and find forgiveness, gives the film its power.

Read more