WEEK IN WOMEN: Women artists create awards for Tribeca Film Fest 2023 – Brandy McDonnell reports

New York’s Tribeca Film Festival and Chanel have announced the artists selected as part of the 2023 Artist Awards Program. As in previous years, Tribeca and Chanel bring together esteemed artists to generously donate an original work, which will be awarded to winning filmmakers at the festival, which this year runs June 7-18. This year, an all-women cohort of 10 acclaimed artists have been invited by Tribeca and Chanel to celebrate their fellow storytellers by creating the awards presented to the filmmakers.

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TRIBECA FILM FEST 2023: Women and Horror – Preview by Alexandra Heller Nicholas

If you are looking for tangible evidence that film festivals are taking equity seriously, the stats surrounding the forthcoming 2023 Tribeca Festival are a good place to start. With 68% of films in competition directed by women and 36% of all features directed by BIPOC filmmakers, when these numbers are weighed up next to the high calibre names it’s frankly hard not to be impressed.

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MICKEY SUMNER on WITH/in, iPhone filmmaking and Trudie Styler – Jennifer Merin interviews

Mickey Sumner’s I’m Listening was shot in response to Maven Screen Media’s WITH/IN short film initiative for Tribeca Film Festival 2021. The directive was simple: Using an iPhone and whatever’s easily at your disposal, shoot a short film dealing with quarantine life in 2020. It’s not as if there wasn’t a surplus of storytelling angles, themes and emotions available, considering how much everyone’s lives changed last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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JACINTA (TFF2020) – Review by Lois Alter Mark

Like mother, like daughter takes on a whole new significance in Jessica Earnshaw’s extraordinary documentary, Jacinta, a devastating movie about the cycle of addiction and dependency. The film presents a powerful portrait of inherited trauma that’s, ultimately, also a story of love and hope.

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BAD RAP — Tribeca Film Festival Review by Candice Frederick

The film’s title says it all: BAD RAP. Sure, it’s a play on words, but it also highlights a type of music that has long been considered the source of racial, political and social aggravation. Which makes it ripe for exploration in the documentary that premiered at Tribeca Film Festival 2016. But filmmaker Salima Koroma doesn’t focus on the negative sociopolitical issues persistently discussed in the media (misogyny, cultural appropriation, sexism, etc). Rather, she opens up the conversation to the far less discussed marginalization of Asian-American rappers in an industry dominated by African-American men

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