A CALL TO SPY – Review by Carol Cling

It may sound strange today, but there once was a time when being anti-fascist was something all Americans could support.(Except, of course, for the Nazi sympathizers.) If you long for those thrilling days of yesteryear, A Call to Spy has you covered. This fact-based World War II espionage drama focuses on not one or two but three intrepid participants in a fledgling British spy service that recruited women for a “club unlike any other,” on the theory that women agents would be more inconspicuous than men.

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THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7 – Review by Martha K Baker

Those who did not live through the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968 or follow coverage of the trial of seven men, the excellent film, The Trial of the Chicago Seven will read as incredible. Just unbelievable. For starters, men accused of being in a conspiracy had never met before that August. For another, a judge appeared to be unqualified at least, viciously loony-tunes at most.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 2, 2020: MISBEHAVIOUR

Activism and intersectionality are at the heart of Philippa Lowthorpe’s fact-based dramedy Misbehaviour, which follows the tumultuous events surrounding the 1970 Miss World pageant in London and their impact on the women’s liberation movement. While always firmly on the side of the feminists who disrupted the event to protest its objectification of women, the film also makes sure to include other important perspectives on women’s roles and representations — which ultimately makes its message all the more effective.

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MISBEHAVIOUR – Review by Loren King

Taking factual, electrifying social/political historical events and turning them into engaging human dramas is something British filmmakers are particularly good at. Two obvious recent examples are Made in Dagenham (2010) about women workers who fought for equal pay at the Ford Motor company’s Dagenham factory; and Pride (2014) about the alliance between striking Welsh miners and London’s young LGBT community in 1984. Misbehaviour is a welcome and rousing feminist addition to this genre.

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MISBEHAVIOUR – Review by Leslie Combemale

At its core, Misbehaviour is a crowd pleaser, and that’s a good thing. All over the world, things have been especially tough on women lately. The film also has strong, inspiring messages, mostly based in the idea that ‘well-behaved women rarely make history’, and that it is essential to upend the status quo if it keeps members of society down.

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MISBEHAVIOUR – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

The focus isn’t on nostalgia but feminist fury. There are two especially galling scenes that are staged for maximum effect. The first is when the contestants walk on stage in swimsuits while their measurements are duly noted, smiling all the while. But then the male announcer on stage says, “There are two sides to everything.” That’s the cue for the women show off their backsides to the crowd for what seems like an eternity. If it sounds demeaning, it is.

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Genesis Rodriguez on CENTIGRADE – Tara McNamara interviews

Genesis Rodriguez stars in Centigrade, a chilling thriller that’s loosely based on a true story which occurred in 2002 in arctic Norway, in the dead of winter, when a young couple and their newborn child were trapped inside a rented vehicle that was buried in snow during a blizzard. With little to eat and only layers of clothing to keep them from freezing to death, the pair struggled for survival. Centigrade was shot in chronological order and has a convincingly claustrophobic ambiance and a gripping authenticity that makes you wonder just what the actors endured while making the film.

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CENTIGRADE – Review by Lana Wilson Combs

Centigrade, from director Brendan Walsh (TV’s Nurse Jackie ) and screenwriter Daley Nixon is loosely based on a true story which occurred in 2002. The movie could have just as easily been titled Trapped since that’s the scary situation the film’s stars, Genesis Rodriguez, (TV’s The Fugitive) and Vincent Piazza (TV’s Passage) find themselves in while traveling in a rented SUV to the arctic mountains of Norway.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK August 14, 2020: THE GRIZZLIES

The Grizzlies, based on a true story, is about a fired-up white outsider coming into a close-knit Indigenous community full of confidence that, with his passion and approachability, he can connect with the skeptical teens he’s there to teach and make a difference. And, to be fair, he does exactly that. But not before he’s forced to learn some hard truths about the folly of thinking you can “fix” another culture — or understand people who’ve been traumatized for generations by colonialism if you haven’t been through it yourself.

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SONG WITHOUT A NAME – Review by Diane Carson

In Song Without a Name, Peruvian director Melina León with tender compassion tells a tragic tale of abducted newborns. Never hurried, the story unfolds at a measured pace with maximum impact devoid of sensationalism. With the perfect choice of black and white cinematography, the images complement the 1988 time frame and the milieu of the indigenous mother Georgina Condori.

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