THIRTEEN LIVES – Review by Susan Granger

On June 23, 2018, twelve soccer players and their coach became trapped in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave in northern Thailand. In Thirteen Lives, director Ron Howard details how they were rescued. While the boys (ages 10 to 16) and their 25 year-old coach were exploring deep into the massive cavern system, heavy rains of the monsoon season began to fall, flooding the exit and stranding them inside.

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THIRTEEN LIVES – Review by Diane Carson

Director Ron Howard’s Thirteen Lives impressively dramatizes actual events from 2018, an equally terrifying and inspiring, seemingly impossible rescue mission. Even knowing the outcome for the twelve Thai Wild Boar soccer boys and their coach as they enter the Tham Luang Cave in Thailand’s northern Chiang Rai Province, a palpable chill takes over as monsoon storms unleash torrents of rain.

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THIRTEEN LIVES – Review by T. J. Callahan

Director, Ron Howard and a star studded cast team up to tell the harrowing story of the soccer team that got trapped in a Thailand cave on June 23rd, 2018. A disaster seen around the world, Thirteen Lives, at 2 1⁄2 hours, gives us a day by day, hour by hour, and minute by minute account from the time the Wild Boars entered the Tham Luang cave system until the last one was pulled to safety after unexpected monsoon rains flooded the cavity and left the boys and their coach stranded for 18 days.

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CRIMES OF THE FUTURE – Review by Susan Granger

Auteur David Cronenberg introduces avant-garde performance artists sometime in the dystopian future when humans have lost the ability to feel physical pain. Perhaps because people eat and metabolize plastic, the human body has evolved, unpredictably growing invasive, nonfunctional organs. It’s called Accelerated Evolution Syndrome. Crimes of the Future is extreme, stomach-churning and definitely not for the squeamish.

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FALLING – Review by April Neale

In his directorial debut, Viggo Mortensen delivers a biographically tinged film that holds up a mirror to mortality. From the beginning, the film reminds us that we all will die, and that everyone’s journey to that end game is filled with beauty and sadness, abuse and adoration, and most of all—at least in Viggo’s case—an appreciation for your family, warts and all.

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THE GREEN BOOK – Review by Susan Granger

This fascinating, true story of an unlikely friendship begins with Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), an elegant, educated Jamaican-American classical pianist who lived in an apartment above Manhattan’s Carnegie Hall. In 1962 when his record company sends him on a concert tour of the Deep South, Dr. Shirley hires a gruff, gluttonous, street-wise bouncer from the Copacabana nightclub to be his driver/road manager.

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GREEN BOOK – Review by Mae Abdulbaki

Peter Farrelly, whose filmography consists of mostly comedies such as There’s Something About Mary and Dumb and Dumber, takes on a different kind of film with Green Book. Co-written by Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, and Brian Hayes Currie, the film downplays Mahershala Ali’s character and backstory, focuses too much on Tony’s perspective, and is far too familiar of a story in all the negative ways.

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AWFJ Movie of the Week, July 3 – July 9: CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

Opening June 17, AWFJ’s Movie of the Week is Captain Fantastic, the sophomore film from actor-turned-filmmaker Matt Ross following his well-received 2012 directorial debut 28 Hotel Rooms. Viggo Mortensen stars as widower Ben, who is devoted to raising his six kids off the grid, imparting freedoms and values he holds most dear.
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