LIZ WHITTEMORE helms ReelNewsDaily.com, hosts Girls On Film Podcast, blogs horror at I SCREAM YOU SCREAM, serves as a member of Team #MOTW and as an AWFJ Board Member.

  Female Film Critics 24/365  Recent Blog Posts

SHE DIES TOMORROW- review by Liz Whittemore

In Amy Seimetz’s newest film, sadness is palpable. That really is the entire premise of the film. The idea of impending death spreads like a disease. Hauntingly scored, She Dies Tomorrow puts you into a state of foreboding from the very first image.

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I USED TO GO HERE – Review by Carol Cling

Contrary to conventional wisdom, you can go home again. But you might not feel at home when you get there. That’s the premise — and, ultimately, the point — of I Used to Go Here, writer-director Kris Rey’s genial, generally insightful character study of a flailing writer whose return to her small-town alma mater provides a temporary escape from her collapsing life.

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MADE IN ITALY – Review by April Neale

James D’Arcy’s filmmaking debut is a lilting and lighthearted look at a father and son coming together after they’ve been estranged for some time. If you want to get lost in a lovely and moving little film, Made In Italy is a comforting bowl of risotto with extra butter and Parmesan, decidedly simple, and filling.

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Sharon McGowan & Jan Miller: Canadian Tax Credit Changes to Benefit Female Filmworkers (Guest Post)

The tax credit program distributes close to one billion dollars annually to Canadian and foreign-service production but does not include policies to address gender equity or inclusion of workers marginalized in the screen industry. The Federal Minister of Canadian Heritage has agreed to address and rectify the issue.

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THE GREEN YEARS – Review by Diane Carson

A bonus of enjoying restorations is discovering previously unfamiliar directors and their work. That’s the case with Portuguese director Paulo Rocha whose 1963 The Green Years didn’t receive a U.S. release. Now available, Rocha’s debut film takes its place among new wave gems shot on location, in beautiful black and white, following its protagonist through coming-of-age romantic experiences.

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ROSE PLAYS JULIE (MIFF 2020) – Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Rose Plays Julie is not shy in its approach to the thematic intersection of power, gender difference and violence and how they feed into the lived experience of women in particular. But it approaches its subject matter with a sophisticated balance of sensitivity and frankness that make these themes both poignant and, at times, far from subtle.

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MADE IN ITALY – Review by Martha K Baker

Do not confuse Made in Italy with The Burnt Orange Heresy. Yes, both are set in beautiful, sunny Italy and both are about art and artists and art dealers. Whereas The Burnt Orange Heresy centers on stealing and head trips, Made in Italy focuses on an estranged widower and his motherless son’s finding each other.

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JUST 6.5 (MIFF 2020)- Review by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas

Fast, smart and thrilling, Just 6.5 is a wild ride into the dark side of Iranian genre cinema. With a climax that demands we rethink the entire ethical construct of how the judicial system treats drug related offenses, Just 6.5 sees Saeed Roustayi excel with his sophomore feature.

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