IF – Review by T.J. Callahan

IF was conceived by John Krasinski (of The Office fame) as a lasting reminder to his daughters that life doesn’t always have to be fun, but it shouldn’t stop us from trying. He also took on the roles of director and co-star as well as the task of amassing a who’s who of live and voiceover cast and crew including fellow Office mate Steve Carell as Blue, the big purple IF.

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ARGYLLE – Review by MaryAnn Johanson

I startled myself awake the morning after my screening with the shocking realization that nothing in the trailer — which has been ubiquitous and inescapable at cinemas for months now — is actually in the damn movie. Or is it? Maybe some of it is? The movie itself had already faded from memory, mere hours later, it’s that blah…

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ARGYLLE – Review by Susan Kamyab

Most critics don’t seem to be fans of Matthew Vaughn’s new action comedy, Argylle, but luckily, I’m in the minority of those who had a blast with it. The film is about an introverted spy novelist played by Bryce Dallas Howard, who is drawn into the activities of a sinister underground organization. It’s best to not take this film too seriously. Just allow yourself to enjoy the ridiculous ride. Argylle is a fast-paced, witty, and action-packed spy comedy that’s well worth seeing on the big screen.

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ARGYLLE – Review by Valerie Kalfrin

With director Matthew Vaughn, best known for Kick-Ass and the Kingsman films, one expects foolishness. This isn’t Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy—or even The Spy Who Loved Me. Argylle is preposterous and messy, but I’ve seen worse, and without the good cheer of Bryce Dallas Howard and Sam Rockwell. It’s pitched at a heightened reality with cartoonish stunts, over-the-top action, zany dance choreography, and disco music. I doubt I’ll see another sequence this year with someone on jerry-rigged knife-blade ice skates slaying enemies in a sit-spin, or people twirling in a gunfight among smoke canisters that bloom into technicolor hearts.

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ARGYLLE – Review by T. J. Callahan

“The greater the spy, the bigger the lie.” This is a great way to describe the new action thriller, Argylle. No one is who they say they are…or are they? Everyone is a double, triple or even quadruple agent in this well choreographed Dancing with the Spies espionage escapade.

Argylle is the title character in a series of spy novels written by the reclusive Ella Conway, played by Bryce Dallas Howard. After Aiden, a real secret agent (Sam Rockwell), shows up at her door ready to save her and her beloved cat, Alfie, from almost certain death, Ella realizes the plot of the new book she’s writing is mirroring real world events in real time. But are they predictions or are they memories?

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SEE HOW THEY RUN – Review by Martha K Baker

Some movies are just for fun. They do not educate or elucidate or elevate. They entertain. See How They Run does just that. The title refers to a nursery rhyme about mice, and that, in turn, refers to a play called The Mousetrap. The Mousetrap happens to be the world’s longest running play, having opened in 1952 for more than 28,000 performances.

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THE BAD GUYS – Review by Leslie Combemale

If you take Oceans Eleven and add the sensibilities and style of DreamWorks Animation, you’ll get the new animated feature The Bad Guys. It’s a fun conceit, especially when some of the best comedians and actors in the business are supplying voices for the lead characters. While the amusing concept and the embarrassment of thespian riches does add up to entertaining viewing and a worthy way to spend your movie money, the plot might strike some as one-dimensional, and it does feel like there should be more sparks flying given the impressive cast.

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THE BAD GUYS – Review by Martha K Baker

The plot is tricky and convoluted, and big chunks make no sense. “The Bad Guys” is based on the Scholastic series by Aaron Blabey from a screenplay by Etan Cohen, known for Men in Black 3. The script plays off caper movies, but it does not always play well. Directed by Pierre Perifel, known for Kung Fu Panda 2, it’s too long and loud, including the music, and holds little novelty, but it does offer lessons in distinguishing trust from distrust. But, for all its noise, it has its heart in the right place.

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JOJO RABBIT – Review by Brandy McDonnell

Set in Germany during the waning days of WWII, the New Zealand filmmaker’s adaptation of Christine Leunen’s novel “Caging Skies” follows 10-year-old Jojo (wonderful newcomer Roman Griffin Davis), a new Hitler Youth recruit who so fancies himself a Nazi zealot that his imaginary friend is a clownish version of Adolf Hitler (Waititi, brilliantly eccentric).

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