SPIRIT UNTAMED – Review by Diane Carson

I endorse the supportive friendship among the three girls, the interracial group of characters, and the condemnation of animal abuse, a positive lesson for all viewers. However, this level of anthropomorphizing animals should have been abandoned long ago.

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SPIRIT UNTAMED – Review by Leslie Combemale

What a pleasure to see such committed, genuine friendships shown between young girls, especially as it relates to the love of horses. Lucky, Pru, and Abigail are the tween version of ‘ride or die’, as they repeatedly risk everything for each other. They are also shown to be brave in terms of their commitment to save the horses, and fearless in how they find ways to problem solve on their journey, doing it together as a team.

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MOVIE OF THE WEEK October 9, 2020: THE GLORIAS

Modern feminism owes a lot to Gloria Steinem, and director Julie Taymor revels in explaining why in The Glorias, her creative biopic about a woman who has fought tirelessly throughout her life for the rights of all women. Taking the title of Steinem’s autobiography — My Life on the Road — literally, Taymor centers her story on a bus on which primary passengers are Steinem at different ages: child (Ryan Kiera Armstrong), young teen (Lulu Wilson), young woman (Alicia Vikander), and mature activist (Julianne Moore).

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THE GLORIAS – Review by Loren King

Even if you’ve traveled through much of Gloria Steinem’s life already — whether by her book My Life on the Road; the play Gloria: A Life written by Emily Mann and directed by Diane Paulus; or the recent Hulu series Mrs. America —Julie Taymor’s inventive, sometimes fantastical, movie The Glorias is a worthwhile trip. Written by Taymor and playwright Sarah Ruhl, much of the material is familiar but no less eye-opening as Taymor follows the feminist trailblazer at different stages of her life, when she is played by four different actresses.

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THE GLORIAS – Review by Susan Wloszczyna

The good news about The Glorias is that Julie Taymor tries to avoid biopic clichés as she employs four actresses at different ages to tell the story of feminist icon Gloria Steinem’s life. But while indulging in her usual visual panache on screen, the director is almost too ambitious in trying to bring this notable legend to life.

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Gloria Steinem on THE GLORIAS, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Women’s Right’s Now – Gill Pringle interviews

Gloria Steinem was still numb with disbelief when we spoke just hours after the death of her old friend, Ruth Bader Ginsberg. The purpose of our chat was for a very different and joyous reason – to talk about Julie Taymor’s adaptation of Steinem’s memoir, My Life on the Road, into a dazzling feature film starring Julianne Moore and Alicia Vikander. “I was so moved that they wanted to do it,” she says of the illustrious actors playing the activist at various ages in The Glorias.

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Julie Taymor on THE GLORIAS and Female Collectivity – Leslie Combemale interviews

Julie Taymor has been making films in Hollywood since way before the recent uptick of (finally) hiring female filmmakers, so she knows a thing or two about fighting, or perhaps better to say, subverting the patriarchy. Her new film The Glorias takes audiences through the life (so far) of political activist, writer, and feminist organizer Gloria Steinem. Given the p*ssy-grabbing hot mess America has become in the last 4 years, the film is landing right on time.

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THE GLORIAS – Review by Martha K Baker

Twin a feminist icon with a theater icon, and you produce one remarkable film. Director Julie Taymor (The Lion King on stage and screen) based her screenplay for The Glorias on Gloria Steinem’s 2015 memoir, My Life on the Road. As a theatrical director, she knows the power of metaphor, of design, of production.

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AFTER THE WEDDING – Review by Diane Carson

With today’s omnipresent information, shadow lives can be discovered and made public, and some decisions merit reconsideration. There are astonishing inequities between rich and poor in the U.S. and India, or almost anywhere in the U.S. But there’s a delicacy needed to presenting ideas for consideration, less can be more. Here the inequity is cast aside as the plot device it is, and the degree of Theresa’s stridency as an abusive boss telegraphs the lack of complexity with added misogyny.

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